VCMC

Series: Self-Employment in Ontario’s Agriculture and Food-related Sectors, 2001 to 2014. Part 2: Self-Employment in Farm Support Services and Food Manufacturing

edar-index9This series of five blog posts is focused on self-employment in agriculture and food-related sectors in Ontario from 2001 to 2014. The data has been collected from OMAFRA’s Analyst (EMSI) database. The blog posts are excerpts from longer reports written by Ray Bollman and available from REAPontario upon request.

Part 2: Self-Employment in Farm Support Services and Food Manufacturing

Key Findings

  • The number of self-employed persons working in support activities for farms has varied widely over the past decade, from a high of 2,400 persons in 2001 to a low of about 700 in 2007, followed by an upward swing.
  • Relative to the equivalent national patterns, the competitive analysis for self-employment for Ontario-level self-employment in support activities for farms shows a lack of competitiveness in the 2001 to 2006 period but positive competitiveness in the 2006 to 2011 period and in the 2011 to 2014 period,.

sw-ep-tech

Self-employment in support services for farms (NAICS 1150)

“The industry sector for “support activities for farms” includes a variety of services that farms purchase from specialized enterprises, for both crop production and livestock production.”

American truck speeding on freeway at sunset, motion blurred.          Examples include

  • grain cleaning,
  • custom work services (planting, baling, harvesting, etc.),
  • crop spraying,
  • farm labour contractors,
  • farm management services,
  • fruit and vegetable sorting and grading services,
  • animal breeding services,
  • farriers,
  • horse boarding and horse training services, etc.

[Statistics Canada, North American Industry Classification System: 2007 (Ottawa: Statistics Canada, Catalogue no. 12-501)]

StatsCan Guide to Labour Force Survey cover

 

In the period from 2001 to 2014, the estimated level of self-employment in this sector has declined from 2,400 in 2001 to about 700 in 2007 and then increased again to 1,800 in 2014 (Figure 3).

 

Figure 3

RB Series Part 2 Figure 3

The assessment of competitiveness in this sector shows considerable variability in the level of self-employment (Figure 3) and the variability is especially noticeable relative to national trends. For example, the Ontario percent change relative to the national percent change in each sub-period were:

  • 65 percentage points lower from 2001 to 2006;
  • 84 percentage points higher from 2006 to 2011; and
  • 21 percentage points higher from 2011 to 2014 (Table 2).

Perhaps obviously, the competitive analysis for self-employment for Ontario-level self-employment in support activities for farms shows a lack of competitiveness in the 2001 to 2006 period but positive competitiveness in the 2006 to 2011 period (600 jobs) and in the 2011 to 2014 period (300 jobs), relative to the national patterns in these periods.

Table 2

RB Series 2Table 2

RAY Bollman 2261 by Valerie Keeler 

 

 

 

Ray D Bollman, Economist – Rural Canada

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *